Jeremy Tatere McLeod on 30 years of Kura Reo at Waimarama (04/01/19)

Kia ora anō – this is the second in an ongoing series of short summaries of Waatea interviews, from the programme Manako. In the original broadcast, Eruera talks to Jeremy about 30 years of Kura Reo at Waimarama, and about Jeremy’s new role running Kura Reo now that Tīmoti Kāretu has stood down as a teacher.

Here is the original broadcast (Jeremy’s voice is unclear in parts, but is mostly audible).

And here’s my summary (in simpler reo Māori).

A quick summary of my kōrero… it’s thirty years since kura reo were started at Waimarama (near Hastings in the North Island). Firstly, it was time for celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of this event, but, in addition, it was time to acknowledge that Tīmoti Kāretu has stopped working as a teacher in kura reo. According to Tīmoti, the young(er) people are ready to take over as teachers now, so he has left. Jeremy goes on to talk about the future of kura reo; he says that the generation coming to kura reo now are different, in that they are more accustomed to digital learning. Therefore, things should change, but he also says changing aspects of kura reo should be done slowly. Tīmoti’s great work as a teacher in the years gone by is acknowledged by both.

In the evening celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of kura reo, there was an element of sadness, because most of the older people who had been there at the start of kura reo have passed on.

Vocabulary (from my version):

Toru tekau ngā tau kua pahure – 30 years have passed.

E tata ana ki – close to

kawe i te kaupapa – take the reins, take over responsibility (lit: carry the matter)

ngā tau e heke mai nei – the years in the future

Ki a ia – according to him

Kua tino waia rātou ki – they are really familiar with / used to

me āta haere – should go carefully

pō whakanui – night celebrating an event

tino pōuri te ngākau – there was sadness in the hearts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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